Welcome to Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.                        

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Insomnia

How did you sleep last night? 
If you are having trouble staying asleep at night, you may qualify for a research study of an investigational medication.

 

You may be eligible if:

· You are a male age 65 or older or a female age 55 or older

· You have trouble sleeping at least 3 times per week and for at least 3 months 
There are additional study requirements to qualify for participation. Qualified participants may receive study-related drug and medical exams. Qualified participants may receive compensation for time and travel. 
For more information:
(904) 621-0390
or email
cbuda@encoredocs.com

C. Diff Vaccine

C. Diff Vaccine Research Study COMING SOON!

 
For more information call:
(904) 621-0390
Or sign up below!


**If this study doesn't work for you, check out our other STUDIES **New Item Body





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Our Staff

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Candy O’Neill

If you haven’t met Candy O’Neill, you’ve probably at least spoken with her over the phone! Candy has been with the Encore Research Group since 2004. She does a fantastic job working at the Fleming Island office as a Recruitment Specialist. In the past, she also worked from the Jacksonville office as a Recruitment Specialist and as a Patient Coordinator.

Candy’s passion is crafting; anything from paper crafts to clay pots and even gardening. She loves to watch HGTV and often turns to it for inspiration. If you haven’t heard some of Candy’s stories, just stick around because she always has an interesting story to tell.

William Davila, MD

Dr. William Davila is the Medical Director and Principal Investigator at ENCORE Research Group’s Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research.

Dr. Davila received his Doctor of Medicine degree from Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto Rico after completing his undergraduate degree from the University of Puerto Rico. Serving in the United States Navy until 2008, he completed his internship at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas and his residency at the Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Dr. Davila is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is licensed by the state of Florida. He has been a primary care physician at Gatien and Associates since 2008. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Fun Facts about Dr. Davila:

Hobbies:               RC Cars

Favorite Food:    Pizza

Favorite Sport:   Basketball

Favorite Movie: Gladiator

Karen Schuran

“I LOVE to shop!  I would shop all the time if I could!” says Karen Schuran, who earns her shopping money by being the Research Assistant and Lab Processor at Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research. Karen has been a member of our research family for 10 years and continues to be a valuable asset to the company.
She and her husband are celebrating their 25th Anniversary of marriage this month. They have two children, a daughter and a son. Karen is also “Grandma” to a cute, fuzzy bunny named Snoopy.
Karen’s favorite sport is football, which she has been learning more about so she can keep up with the men in the house. She also likes to watch game shows like Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy, but Karen admits her real guilty pleasure is horror movies. “I absolutely LOVE horror movies, the scarier the better!”

Lastest Blog Post:


4 Major Developments In Vaccine Research

Written by: Dr. Jeff Jacqmein

As we are beginning to prepare for vaccine season here at ENCORE Research now is a great time to inform you of some of the recent advancements in the field. There are many vaccines in the pipeline (http://www.who.int/immunization/diseases/en/) and with volunteers like you we look forward to helping bring them to market.  I have selected four major developments to share with you that demonstrate how the field is evolving and the technology is improving.

Recently there has been major concern worldwide about the spread of Zika virus, which is especially worrisome to pregnant patients. The National Institutes of Health is using a piece of DNA with genes that code for Zika, but are not infective to create a new vaccine. When the vaccine is injected into the arm muscle, the body reads the genes and creates virus-like particles which the body then thinks is an infection and then mounts a complete and lasting immune response. However, this is not the only way DNA is being used in vaccine creation.

DNA cloning has transformed the vaccine development process to shorten the average vaccine approval time while increasing safety. Previously, vaccine approval took 10-15 years to progress from laboratory development to clinical trials.  Researchers can now genetically engineer cows or rabbits with human DNA to gather more accurate information on safety, efficacy and potency of vaccines in pre-clinical trials.  This is important because it results in a safer and more effective product reaching patients in clinical trials sooner. 

Pertaining to vaccine efficacy is the third advancement I would like to share with you, which is development of new vaccine adjuvants.  Adjuvants are added to a vaccine to help the recipient create a stronger and longer-lasting immune response. According to a recent article in Immune Network, there are six new classes of vaccine adjuvants in clinical development. These developments are critically important because although recent vaccines are safer, they tend to provoke a weaker immune response when compared to past inoculations for smallpox and polio. An example of this is many older people requiring a Herpes Zoster booster vaccine to prevent shingles. 

Lastly, is the invention of Nanopatch technology.  Historically, vaccines needed to be stored frozen or refrigerated until just prior to dosing. This requirement significantly limited vaccine distribution, especially in remote locations. Nanopatch technology, does not have the same temperature requirement making it more practical for helping end diseases in countries where refrigeration is not readily available. The skin vaccination patch contains thousands of vaccine-coated microprojections that penetrate the skin and deliver the vaccine into localized immune cells.  This technology could revolutionize the field!

Although we have more tools than ever, clinical scientific progress would be stunted without you, our volunteers. While it may be in self-interest to enroll in a vaccine trial aimed at keeping your cancer in remission (http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-making-serious-progress-on-a-universal-cancer-vaccine), it is an act of service to your fellow man to dedicate yourself to a typical vaccine clinical trial. Because of you, we helped to bring the meningitis B vaccine to market within two years of major college campus outbreaks (http://www.nmaus.org/disease-prevention-information/serogroup-b-meningococcal-disease/outbreaks/). It is recognized that adults who receive successful vaccines help prevent the spread of contagious disease and ultimately protect those who cannot be immunized for health or other reasons. I regularly appreciate our volunteers when I am able to prescribe an FDA-approved vaccine to a private practice patient. It is truly rewarding to work together to help prevent disease.

 


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